When Tedros Moves His Lips, Beijing Speaks

Tedros Adhanom WHO Speaks

On February 15, 2020, the director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, addressed the Munich Security Conference. At that time, there were only about 60K cases of COVID-19 in China and about 500 in the rest of the world. Tedros was more concerned with misinformation than with containment. In his address, he said:

“We’re not just fighting an epidemic; we’re fighting an infodemic. Fake news spreads faster and more easily than this virus, and is just as dangerous.” And if we don’t tackle this, he went on, “we are headed down a dark path that leads nowhere but division and disharmony.”

Even if Tedros was just moving his lips while the ministry of propaganda back in Beijing was doing the actual talking, truer words about the “dark path” have never been spoken. The whole COVID-19 affair with its inflated high mortality rates (currently claimed by the WHO to be 3.9% when in actuality it’s less than 0.5%), artificial shortage to PPE (it exists, it’s just being diverted away from the US by the Chinese), and incendiary MSM coverage, is an information warfare campaign and China is using Tedros and the MSM as a delivery vector.

A Profile of a Chinese Enabler
Tedros was voted WHO director-general in 2017, replacing another incompetent Chinese medical prodigy, Dr. Margaret Chan. Tedros is the first WHO director-general without a medical degree. He also has the worst job qualifications in the written history of employment.

Tedros got his bachelors degree in biology from the University of Asmara in Eritrea. After his graduation, he served in a junior position at the Ministry of Health under the Marxist dictatorship of Mengistu. After the fall of Mengistu in 1991, he showed up in the UK and got a masters degree in Immunology of Infectious Diseases from the University of London. In 2000, he got a PhD in Community Health from the University of Nottingham. His dissertation was titled: “The effects of dams on malaria transmission in Tigray Region, northern Ethiopia.” From the writing style analysis of the treatise, it is unlikely that he wrote his own dissertation.

Just like another clueless British sponsored PhD, Joseph Mifsud, Tedros’s subsidized academic pedigree also hints of political grooming. This plan apparently derailed when Tedros chose to become a Chinese client instead of continuing to pay homage to his old (and cash-strapped) patrons at the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

From 2005-2012, under Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, Tedros was the Minister of Health. During his tenure, he covered-up one of the worst outbreaks of cholera in Ethiopian history. Between 2012-2016, he was the Ethiopian foreign minister and was involved in the violent suppression and starvation of the rival Amhara clan. A little known biographical detail about Tedros is that he was the 3rd ranking member of the politburo of the Tigray Peoples Liberation Front (TPLF) Terrorist Organization.

Tedros Adhanom
Image 1: Tedros, his FPLF linkage, and his full-time job as China’s propaganda mouthpiece

Tedros’s rapid rise to the top of the directorship of the WHO began after his collaboration with Bill Gates and the Clinton Foundation and its CHAI initiative. Running some analytics on Tedros’s activity between 1991-2018 shows conduct riddled with fraud, corruption, the worst forms of human rights abuses, and scandals.

Tedros with the Bills
Image 2
: Tedros with his power base, the Bills

Tedros  lying about the 2016 Ethiopian Army Troops Firing at Peaceful Demonstrators
Image 3
: Tedros lying about the Ethiopian police/army being unarmed and not firing and attacking the crowd at the Irreecha cultural festival in Bishoftu on October 2, 2016.  “Indeed, it is quite clear from the videos that there was no shooting and the police were unarmed.” 

Glaring character flaws and dishonesty aside, an interesting point of convergence between Tedros, China, and the COVID-19 pandemic is that Ethiopia received billions of dollars in Chinese aid over the past few years. Tedros has personally benefited from this aid in the form of several well-padded foreign bank accounts. In this context, it doesn’t take much effort to figure out why he advised Ethiopian Airlines to continue to fly daily from major Chinese cities. This is while 59 other air carriers from 44 different countries all grounded their flights to and from China. Ethiopian Airlines still insists that it will follow directives from the WHO and continue its daily China flights.

HRC Political Office vs. Donations
Image 4: HRC political office vs. donations to the Clinton Foundation. In 2016, Tedros brokered a $100 million donation to the Clinton foundation. Within a few months, he became the director-general of the WHO. In 2017, Bill Clinton described Tedros as “one of the ablest public servants I ever worked with.

In terms of the Chinese logistical involvement in making this epidemic pandemic, it just happens that they financed and built the international airport in Addis Ababa. This airport is the ‘gateway’ for travel between China and Africa. It is also a major hub for European and US traffic. Ethiopia’s Bole airport sees, on average, 1500 passengers per day arriving from China. 

Tedros Adhanom Thank You China
Image 5
: Thank you China for ‘bolstering the fight against COVID19’, giving the MHO 20 million dollars, and providing its African clients with endless supply of PPE.

Any discussion about the emerging Chinese infodemic narrative, their latest western influence operations, and the WHO complacency in this activity should be viewed through these Tedros related statements:

On using Google and SM to suppress counter WHO narrative
“Given the misinformation about the novel coronavirus epidemic, WHO has communicated with some companies including Google to ensure that the public will get the authoritative information from the WHO.”

On international travel restriction to and from China
“Travel restrictions [to and from China] can have the effect of increasing fear and stigma, with little public health benefit.”

On quarantine requirements for the sick
“The lockdown of people is unprecedented in public health history, so it is certainly not a recommendation the WHO has made.”

On spreading official Chinese government propaganda
“The WHO highly appreciates the tremendous efforts China has made to contain the epidemic.”

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus China, China, China
Image 6
: Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, ‘All good things come from China’

Where is the COVID-19 Messaging Coming From?
The majority of the aggressive narrative regarding the lethality of the COVID-19 pandemic and it’s apocalyptic nature is coming from the WHO and a related international network of activist, politicians, high-tech guys, and reporters. A large number of these ‘activists’ are US based MSM journalists. Running some SIGINT on the sources of the messaging shows clear signs of 4C activity, timing, and a publication strategy. Not surprisingly, the main stated objective in many of these communications is the political targeting of the Trump administration. It is also of note that some of these individuals include politicians, who have been discussing the need and working on the development of ‘scientific eye candy’ to support the predictions of a zombie apocalypse.

If you still doubt that this is a coordinated campaign, here is a sampling of the massaging topics that the ‘COVID-19 network’ has generated over the past 10 weeks:

  • Trump has made America a failed state and a third world country
  • The ‘Jewish involvement’ in the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Stock market is collapsing and people will lose all their savings
  • Hospitals will be overwhelmed
  • The reason for PPE shortage in the US is the Trump administration
  • The Corona virus infects and kills both young and old at the same rate
  • Trump is doing nothing to stop the spread of the virus
  • Reference to the Chinese origin of virus is racist and xenophobic
  • The Chinese have done everything to combat the pandemic
  • Trump will declare martial law and eliminate the 2020 elections
  • Need to mobilize Web 2.0 platforms and SMEs to support the narrative

The following is a sampling of three profiles of member of the ‘COVID-19 network’ of contributors from outlets like WaPo, NYT, and the foreign media.

Brian Klass WaPo Reporter and Agent Saboteur Extraordinaire
Brian Klass is an American originally from Minnesota who lives and works in the UK. He is governor Mark Dayton’s former driver. He received his BA from Carleton College, a masters degree in Politics Science from Oxford, and his PhD in Comparative Government from Oxford. He has worked with Soros affiliated organizations and has ties to the British IC. He is a fellow in the department of global politics at the London School of Economics, an assistant professor of global politics at University College London, and a reporter for The Washington Post.

Brian Klass About Me
Image 7: Brian Klass in his own words

Klass knows several of the key players in the Steele Dossier such as Luke Harding and Ellen Nakashima (the reporter behind the allegation that the Russians hacked/leaked the DNC emails). Klass is a frequent television commentator and democratic political consultant, a US campaign adviser, and political analyst of US and foreign policy in mainstream media outlets like CNN, MSNBC, and CBS. He is an author of “The Despot’s Apprentice: Donald Trump’s Attack on Democracy”, the “The Despot’s Accomplice: How the West is Aiding and Abetting the Decline of Democracy”, and  the Co-Author of “How to Rig an Election”.  

Brian Klass and Friends
Image 8
: Brian Klass, sample of his linkage and political MSM activity

Ferris Jabr
Image 9: The profile of Ferris Jabr, the ‘authority’ referenced in the February 2020 edits of the Wikipedia entry about the mortality rates of the Spanish Flu (changing them from 10%-20% to 1%-3%), thus, promoting the narrative that COVID-19 is as deadly as the Spanish Flu

Colonel Coşkun Başbuğ
Image 10:
Coşkun Başbuğ, Retired Turkish intelligence Colonel specialist in psychological warfare in an interview on Turkish TV: “of course, Jews are behind this…”

*** [Update 03/24/2020 ] ***
I’ve received several requests for a proof that MSM outlets have coordinated the above mentioned ‘massaging topics’ well in advance. For example, that they would predict false astronomical death rates. The following is a posting by Chris Hayes, a lead reporter with MSNBC that predicts a 50% mortality rate.

MSNBC's Chris Hayes 50 Percent Death Rate from COVID 19

*** [Update 03/25/2020 ] ***
’CBS This Morning’ video footage substitution fake. Using imagery from an “ER Ward” in a hospital in Bergamo Lombardy in Northern Italy and passing it as footage an ER in a New York city hospital in order to enhance the fear messaging and attacks on the Trump administration. CBS senior editorial instructions were to ‘strip the Sky News watermarks from the footage’ so as not to expose its foreign source. The Sky News piece itself is also full of false claims like that the COVID-19 mortality rate is 50%.

CBS Italy Hospitcal in New York

*** [Update 03/26/2020 ] ***
America is a failed state (another item in the above mentioned massaging topics). The following is a sample posting by Julia Ioffe, a GQ Magazine reporter who posted a piece titled “Who’s the shithole country now?”.

 America is a failed state

References and Sourcing
XRVision Sentinel AI Platform – Face recognition, image reconstruction, and object classification

The Effects of Dams on Malaria Transmission in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia, and Appropriate Control Measures – Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, University of Nottingham, 2000

Samples of massaging topics showing up in media coverage
Racist Attitudes Could Aid & Abet the Spread of the Pandemic: Laurie Garrett on Coronavirus
New Evidence of Trump’s Botched Response to Coronavirus: Democracy Now
Coronavirus cases could swamp South Dakota hospitals if projections hold: USA Today

Wikipedia Edits Showing an Alignment of the Spanish Flu with the COVID-19 mortality rates
Pre-February 22, 2020 Wikipedia Spanish flu article, the “Around the globe” section stats:

The global mortality rate from the 1918–1919 pandemic is not known, but an estimated 10% to 20% of those who were infected died (case-fatality ratio).”

Post-February 22, 2020 Wikipedia Spanish flu article, the “Around the globe” section stats:

“Estimates vary as to the total number who died. An estimate from 1991 says it killed 25–39 million people.[47] A 2005 estimate put the death toll at probably 50 million (less than 3% of the global population)…”

Copyright 2020 Yaacov Apelbaum, All Rights Reserved.

Windows Live Credit Card Phishing

Phish

I recently received an email claiming to be from Microsoft Live. The email stated that due to some processing issues, they could not authorize my credit card and so I would need to login to their website to update my credit card information by clicking on their link.

Over the years, I have seen a number of these types of messages, but this was the first one targeting me personally.  After skimming through it, I realized that it was a blatant phishing attempt, nevertheless, I still marveled at the ingenuity of the scammers.

Yaacov Apelbaum-Fake MSN Image

Billing and Account Management

Dear Windows Live Hotmail member,
During our regularly scheduled account maintenance and verification procedures, our billing department was unable to authorize your current payment method information.

This might be due to either of the following reasons:

A recent change in your personal information (i.e. change of address, credit card)

Submitting invalid information during the initial Sign Up or upgrade process.

An inability to accurately verify your selected payment method information due to an internal error within our processors.
Please use the following link to update your payment method information :

http://billing.microsoft.com/logon.srf?action=SignIn&reason=auth&type=auto&uid=187&acct=49472101102

The above link may have been blocked for your privacy. To activate the link please look for the Show content link that is usually located on top of this message.

NOTE! If your account information is not updated within 48 hours then your ability to use your Windows Live Hotmail account will become restricted.

Thank you for using Windows Live Hotmail!
Please do not reply to this e-mail, as this is an unmonitored alias.

Yaacov Apelbaum-Fake Windows Live Image

  © 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

For the uninitiated, phishing (pronounced “fishing”) is a fraudulent attempt to acquire sensitive information from a user.  Such information can be: credit cards, user IDs, passwords, and/or account information.  It is often accomplished via email or phone

Phishing falls into the category of exploits  known as “social engineering”. Even though they are mostly low tech, (requiring neither sophisticated technology nor advanced programming), they can to be successful (especially the well executed and new exploits) because most people tend instinctively to do what they are told and will not challenge the authority and authenticity of what seems to be an official correspondence.

In a typical phishing scenario, the perpetrators (usually located offshore) send a simple email—claiming to be from the customer service department of a recognizable organization  (like a bank, on-line service, etc.)—the email will inform you of some  problem with your account. You are then instructed to provide details of your bank, email, or credit card account in order to correct this problem.

Even though, phishing exploits can have many variations, they can be grouped into the following are five usage scenarios:

  1. Forged identities — In this exploit, the attacker creates an email address that is related to a reputable organization like “Windows Live Customer Support”. Even though on the surface, their email address looks legitimate (as in: billing@windowslive.com), it is not. If you’re not paying attention, it can be easy to mistake a message like this for a genuine customer support request.
  2. Compromised accounts — In this exploit, the attacker uses a compromised user account to send an email to everyone in the address book for that account. An email you receive from a known account dramatically increases the credibility of that message, and therefore the likelihood of a successful phishing attack.
  3. Direct phone calls — In this exploit, the scammer may contact you directly by phone, telling you that they work for some financial institution (may offer to lower your interest rates) or the fraud investigation departments.  They will inform you that your account has been breached and will directly ask you for your account details in order to verify it.
  4. Bogus websites — In this exploit, the attacker will send you a link to what seems to be a functional website.  The site will include official-looking logos, language, or other identifying information taken directly from a legitimate websites. The address of the site will show resembles the name of a reputable company but with some spelling variations. For example, the name”microsoft.live.com” could appear instead as: “micorsoft.live.com”
  5. Social Network Harvesting — In this exploit, a communication from a scammer will ask you for personal information.  You may mistake it for an email from a friend wanting to reconnect. The email will include convincing details about your personal life which ware recovered from social networks such as LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.

In general, the objective of phishing is to recover your webmail credentials since the resale value of a legitimate web mail account on the black market can be as high as $2-$3—twice the amount they could get for a stolen credit card number.  So for a phisher, breaching several dozens accounts a day can be a lucrative business, making $100K-$500K for the life of the scam.

In the case of my phishing email, when I followed the link in it,  I was taken to a credit card entry form (Image 1). As I expected, the form looked genuine, it had all the right corporate trimmings: a Microsoft logo, copyright notice, and even a link to a help page (which ironically offered the following advice “You should keep this number secret, protect it, and never write it on your card.”)

Yaacov Apelbaum-Phishing Credit Card Form 
Image 1: Phishing Credit Card Entry Form

As with most phishing sites, I was expecting to find some bogus or misspelled Microsoft URL, but instead I was surprised to see that the web address of the webpage actually belonged to a company called Human & Technology H&T (Image 2), clearly, htech21.com doesn’t even sound like Microsoft.  I’ve checked the parent URL out and It turns out, that this company was at one point a legitimate Korean hardware manufacturer, than, two years ago, their CEO was arrested and the company became the target of one of the biggest class-action lawsuits in history.

CEO So what is the connection between htech21.com and this phishing expedition?  It appears that the perpetrators of this scam decided to cut some costs and instead of purchasing and hosting their own domain, they chose to break into the H&T corporate web site and place their credit card collection pages on it.  At one point, our scammers discovered that Human & Technology has gone out of business (this could also have been an inside job) and safely assumed that this orphaned website (which has not been updated for 3 years) is no longer being maintained or monitored, and as such, was a perfect staging platform for a phishing operation.

It is also interesting to note, that the site’s help file focused on ATMs (Automated Teller Machines), strongly suggests that at least some of the phishing website contents have also been used in other scams.

ATM

Yaacov Apelbaum-Human & Technology Phishing Website Korean  Yaacov Apelbaum-Human & Technology Phishing Website English
Image 2: Phishing Host Website

It is hard to recognize legitimate customer service communications from phishing expeditions. This difficulty if further compounded by the fact that for many, using services such as Amazon, EBay, and e-banking has now become a  a way of life.  For most users, the potential inconvenience of being looked out of their favorite on-line services outweighs the risk of disclosing their account information. Unfortunately, the on-line services are not helping this situation either because most are either impossible to reach by phone or their offshore support centers are largely useless.

So how does one survive in the hostile jungle of email exploits? The following are my top 10 Do’s and Don’ts of email:

  • Do Not open emails that have a wrong or incorrect spelling of your name. Phishers often harvest email addresses in balk and may not have your full name. Because of this, they will try to guess your name from your email address.
  • Do Not open emails that are not addressed to you by name. Phishers will almost never personalize correspondences; they will refer to you as “Dear Customer” or “Dear Valued Customer” because they send balk solicitations to millions of email addresses.
  • Do Not respond to any account management email requests that come from your bank. If your bank needs to reach you, they will send you an official letter or leave you a voice mail with a valid callback telephone number.
  • Do Not open unsolicited emails. Nothing in life is free, this includes the invitation to view naked celebrities and the Prozac and Viagra offers in your inbox.
  • Do Not use email links to go to any financial websites. Type in the URL yourself and save it as a bookmark.
  • Do verify the website URL you are about to log into, check the spelling carefully before you provide your login details on any web page.  Pay close attention to domain name following the “http://” section of the address.  Many phishers will Intentionally create very long names to obfuscate the fake URL.
  • Do log in to your on-line accounts regularly and look for unrecognized transactions.  Do the same with your monthly credit card statements.
  • Do Not send your account details via email to anyone.  email traffic is unencrypted, so anyone on route can intercept the message.
  • Do check that the Internet connection you are using is secure. Look for HTTPS in the address field of your browser.  You may also want to click on theEncrypted connection iconpadlock to view the actual server certificate.  This will help you verify that it was issued by a reputable authority and assigned to the company managing the website in question.
  • Do make sure that you have an updated anti-virus software and that your firewall is turned on.

© Copyright 2009 Yaacov Apelbaum All Rights Reserved.

Mortgage Refinancing Shysters II

Yaacov Apelbaum-The Shysters II

In Mortgage Refinancing Shysters, Part I I wrote about some suspicious refinancing solicitation letters I got from the Intercontinental Capital Group (ICG). After writing about it, I got several interesting comments. One cryptic comment came from what appeared to be a former employee who wrote: “I agree with your assessment on ICG and know this for a fact…” Now my curiosity was piqued. What was it that this individual knew?

I performed a detailed search on the term “Intercontinental Capital Group and Fraud” but this time, the search returned many more postings about unscrupulous dealings. There were many negative comments regarding ICG, but I noticed that there were also a few positive ones written by apparently satisfied customers.

The details of the pro-ICG postings were interesting. They appeared to have come from bona fide customers. On the one hand, the language seemed to be unbiased acknowledging some bad online press while on the other hand the writers claimed that they were very satisfied with the quality of service they received from ICG and that the company was entirely above board. One example read:

…I previously cancelled an appraisal appointment that I had scheduled with this company because I read something online that got me nervous especially being a single mom that just got back to work after being injured. I checked out these links and feel a lot better. I am going to give them a call and hopefully the rates are still low because I really would like to get rid of this adjustable rate mortgage and lower my monthly payments.
by educatedconsumer August 6, 2009 5:13

Then last week, I myself received a similar comment on my blog posting from a user who identified himself as “Joseph.” He wrote:

I received one of their letters and refinanced with them. They did a fine job and got me a good rate. I agree that maybe it wasn’t the best way of soliciting business, but it’s a tough market. Either way, they did the job they promised to do.
by Joseph October 28, 2009 13:33

Now, I don’t know about most people, but I certainly don’t spend my free time posting positive comments on blogs trying to sway other readers to believe that allegations of fraudulent or contentious services are unfounded.

I suspected that Joseph had some vested interest in ICG. From the crux of the comment left by him, it seemed that he was so moved by his mortgage refinancing experience that he became overwhelmed with the desire to spread the good news about ICG to the rest of the world.

When I examined the comment source, I noticed that the e-mail associated with it was jennifermargulis@gmail.com. Now it is possible that Jennifer, following the romantic style of George Sand, was using a nom de plume. But on the other hand it was also possible that Joseph was Jennifer’s darker side, I have heard of stranger things before. So I did some more research, then I slipped into my feminine persona and contacted her via e-mail asking for mortgage refinancing advice.

It did not take to long before I received the following ICG e-mail:

Hi Brittney,

Intercontinental Capital Group can probably give you a good rate and fast service. Their website is:

http : //www.intercontinentalcapitalgroup.com

You should contact Brad Allen over there, he can give you the information you’re looking for. His phone number is 212.485.9655. His direct e-mail is ballen@icghome.com.

I hope they are able to help you!

Best,

Jennifer Margulis

————————————————————
Hi,

I am looking into refinancing my home mortgage and would like to get more information about your services and rates.

Can you please provide more information about your offerings?

Best regards,

Brittney Darcey

A quick identify search confirmed my suspicions that Joseph and Jennifer Margulis were indeed one and the same (see image below). It also turns out that Jennifer was in fact an ICG marketing employee on a company mission to rehabilitate the ICG’s public image. Apparently, she found my posting about her company and decided to sprinkle some fluffy propaganda comments. To make them look more credible, her comments were disguised as coming from little Joseph, your all-American, happy and satisfied mortgage customer.

 Yaacov Apelbaum-Jennifer ICG Yaacov Apelbaum-ICG Margulis-1

Deceptive solicitation letters, whitewashing negative customer feedback and impersonating legitimate users in order to lure customers have no place in any business, even less so, in financial organizations that above all should uphold integrity and honesty.

Caveat Emptor

© Copyright 2009 Yaacov Apelbaum All Rights Reserved.